Course project part 1

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Here you will use the course project template to write the Purpose, Scope, Situation & Assumptions of the Base Plan.  This includes completion of the title page, promulgation statement, signature page, and approval and implementation page. 

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EMH490 Emergency Planning Project

(
Title of Plan)


(Planning Community)


(Student’s name)


PROMULGATION STATEMENT

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The promulgation statement enters the plan “in force.” Promulgation is the process that officially announces/declares a plan (or law). It gives the plan official status and gives both the authority and the responsibility to organizations to perform their tasks. It should also mention the responsibilities of tasked organizations with regard to preparing and maintaining standard operating procedures and should commit those organizations to carry out the training, exercises, and plan maintenance needed to support the plan. The promulgation document also allows the chief executives to affirm their support for emergency management. The following is sample language.)

(
NAME OF CHIEF ELECTED OFFICIAL)

(
TITLE)

(
NAME OF JURISDICTION)

(
NAME OF JURISDICTION) EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN

PROMULGATION

 

The primary role of government is to provide for the welfare of its citizens. The welfare and safety of citizens is never more threatened than during disasters. The goal of emergency management is to ensure that mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery actions exist so that public welfare and safety is preserved.

The (
Name of Jurisdiction) Emergency Operations Plan provides a comprehensive framework for (
Jurisdiction)-wide emergency management. It addresses the roles and responsibilities of government organizations and provides a link to local, State, Federal, and private organizations and resources that may be activated to address disasters and emergencies in (
Name of Jurisdiction).

The (
Name of Jurisdiction) Emergency Operations Plan ensures consistency with current policy guidance and describes the interrelationship with other levels of government. The plan will continue to evolve, responding to lessons learned from the actual disaster and emergency experiences, ongoing planning efforts, training and exercise activities, and Federal guidance.

Therefore, in recognition of the emergency management responsibilities of (
Jurisdiction) government and with the authority vested in me as the Chief Executive Officer of (
Name of Jurisdiction), I hereby promulgate the (
Name of Jurisdiction) Emergency Operations Plan.

____________________________________

(
Name)

(
Title), (
Name of Jurisdiction)

SIGNATURE PAGE


(
Name), (
Title) (
Name), (
Title)

(
Jurisdiction) (
Jurisdiction)


(
Name), (
Title) (
Name), (
Title)

(
Jurisdiction) (
Jurisdiction)


(
Name), (
Title) (
Name), (
Title)

(
Jurisdiction) (
Jurisdiction)


(
Name), (
Title) (
Name), (
Title)

(
Jurisdiction) (
Jurisdiction)

APPROVAL AND IMPLEMENTATION

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The approval and implementation page introduces the plan, outlines its applicability, and indicates that it supersedes all previous plans. It should also include a delegation of authority for specific modifications that can be made to the plan and by whom they can be made without the senior official’s signature. It should include a date and must be signed by the senior official(s) such as the governor, Tribal leader(s), mayor, county judge, commissioner. The following is sample language.)

This plan supersedes the (
Name of Jurisdiction) Emergency Operation Plan dated (
Month, Day, Year).

The transfer of management authority for actions during an incident is done through the execution of a written delegation of authority from an agency to the incident commander. This procedure facilitates the transition between incident management levels. The delegation of authority is a part of the briefing package provided to an incoming incident management team. It should contain both the delegation of authority and specific limitations to that authority.

The (
Name of Jurisdiction) Emergency Operations Plan delegates the (
Chief Elected Official) ‘s authority to specific individuals in the event that he or she is unavailable. The chain of succession in a major emergency or disaster is as follows:

(
Position Title)

(
Position Title)

(
Position Title)

(
Position Title)

(
Position Title)

RECORD OF CHANGES

Change #

Date

Part Affected

Date Posted

Who Posted

RECORD OF DISTRIBUTION

Plan #

Office/Department

Representative

Signature

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2

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
(Please adjust page numbers before you submit each section)

TITLE PAGE_________________________________________________1

PROMULGATION STATEMENT__________________________________2

SIGNATURE PAGE____________________________________________3

APPROVAL AND IMPLEMENTATION_____________________________4

RECORD OF CHANGES________________________________________5

RECORD OF DISTRIBUTION_____________________________________6

PURPOSE, SCOPE, SITUATION OVERVIEW, ASSUMPTIONS__________8

CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS

ORGANIZATION AND ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES

DIRECTION, CONTROL, AND COORDINATION

INFORMATION COLLECTION, ANALYSIS, AND DISSEMINATION

COMMUNICATIONS

ADMINISTRATION, FINANCE, AND LOGISTICS

PLAN DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE

AUTHORITIES AND REFERENCES

1. Purpose, Scope, Situation, and Assumptions

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The purpose section should describe the purpose of the plan. The scope section should describe to whom the plan applies. The situation overview should describe the geographic characteristics and hazards. The assumption section should include reasonable statements assumed to be true. The following is sample language.)


Purpose

It is the purpose of this Plan to define the actions and roles necessary to provide a coordinated response within (
Name of Jurisdiction). This plan provides guidance to agencies within (
Name of Jurisdiction) with a general concept of potential emergency assignments before, during, and following emergency situations. It also provides for the systematic integration of emergency resources when activated and does not replace county or local emergency operations plans or procedures.


Scope

This plan applies to all participating departments and agencies of the jurisdictions contained within the geographical boundary of (
Name of Jurisdiction).


Situation Overview

Characteristics

Location

(
Name of Jurisdiction) includes (
Name of City/County 1) and (
Name of City/County 2).

Geographic

(
Name of City/County 1) is the (
fifth) largest (
City/County) in the state. (
Name of City/County 2) lies west of (
Name of City/County 1) and is the gateway to the jurisdiction. A map illustrating the areas covered by the plan is shown as follows.

Demographic

(
Name of Jurisdiction) has a population of 950,000 residents as of July 1, 2007. Daytime population in (
Name of Jurisdiction) exceeds 1,020,000 due to large commercial and industrial areas in the southeastern portion of the jurisdiction. The jurisdiction is also a popular base for outdoor adventurists, attracting a large number of tourists each year.

Designated Areas of Interest

Two State parks within the jurisdiction are visited by over 1 million tourists during the months of June, July, August, and September.

Special Events

In mid-August, (
Name of Jurisdiction) hosts the State County Fair for two weeks. The fair is usually attended by 750,000 people.

Economic Base and Infrastructure

(
Name of Jurisdiction)’ s economy has evolved from its traditional tourism and textile dependence into one of great diversity. Today’s commercial and industrial manufacturing base is complemented by solid and growing trade and service sectors. Much tourism activity is centered around (
Capital City/County Seat). This economic diversification has helped create new employment and smooth the impact of cyclical swings. As a result, unemployment rates have been below State and national averages since 1987. Finances have improved with three years of surplus operations and are expected to be further strengthened by solid operating results in 2008.

Hazard Profile

Potential Hazards

(
City/County/State) is subjected to the effects of many disasters, varying widely in type and magnitude from local communities to statewide in scope.

Disaster conditions could be a result of a number of natural phenomena such as avalanches, earthquakes, floods, severe thunderstorms, high water, drought, severe winter weather, fires (including urban, grass, and forest fires), epidemics, severe heat, or high winds. Apart from natural disasters, (
City/County/State) is subject to a myriad of other disaster contingencies, such as derailments, aircraft accidents, transportation accidents involving chemicals and other hazardous materials, plant explosions, chemical oil and other hazardous material spills, leaks or pollution problems, dumping of hazardous wastes, building or bridge collapses, utility service interruptions, energy shortages, civil disturbances or riots, terrorism, warfare, applicable criminal acts, or a combination of any of these.

Vulnerability Assessment

(
Name of City/County 1)

The vulnerability assessment checklist for (
Name of City/County 1) is shown below.

(
Name of City/County 2)

The vulnerability assessment checklist for (
Name of City/County 2) is shown below.


Planning Assumptions

Effective prediction and warning systems have been established that make it possible to anticipate certain disaster situations that may occur throughout the jurisdiction or the general area beyond the jurisdiction’s boundaries.

It is assumed that any of the disaster contingencies could individually, or in combination, cause a grave emergency situation within (
Name of Jurisdiction). It is also assumed that these contingencies will vary in scope and intensity, from an area in which the devastation is isolated and limited to one that is wide-ranging and extremely devastated. For this reason, planning efforts are made as general as possible so that great latitude is available in their application, considering they could occur in several locations simultaneously.

Initial actions to mitigate the effects of emergency situations or potential disaster conditions will be conducted as soon as possible by the local government.

Assistance to the affected jurisdictions(s) by response organizations from another jurisdiction(s) is expected to supplement the efforts of the affected jurisdiction(s) in an efficient, effective, and coordinated response when jurisdiction officials determine their own resources to be insufficient.

Federal and State disaster assistance, when provided, will supplement, not substitute for, relief provided by local jurisdictions.

It is the responsibility of officials under this plan to save lives, protect property, relieve human suffering, sustain survivors, repair essential facilities, restore services, and protect the environment.

When a jurisdiction receives a request to assist another jurisdiction, reasonable actions will be taken to provide the assistance as requested.


Concept of Operations

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The concept of operations section should describe the general sequence of the planned response.)

General

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This section should contain general information about the tasks that need to be completed to ensure an effective response. This section can also serve as an introduction to the response tasks outlined below. The tasks below represent a logical flow of response from the time an impending or actual emergency or disaster situation is perceived through recovery.)

Communications is maintained between affected jurisdictions and area emergency management branch offices. Branch office personnel may respond to the jurisdiction to facilitate ongoing information exchange.

(
City/County) commissioners may declare local states of emergency and request State assistance. All requests for State assistance should go through the local emergency management area coordinator and the appropriate emergency management branch manager to the State Emergency Operations Center (EOC).

When the State EOC is activated, the (
Name of Emergency Management Agency) becomes the office of primary responsibility for the State Emergency Response Team (SERT). The director of emergency management will normally serve as SERT leader.

(
Local/County) EOCs will serve as clearinghouses for response and recovery operations and for deployment of resources within the counties, including cities within the counties.

Planning for recovery will be implemented at the same time local governments are taking the emergency response actions necessary to protect the public. Preparations will be made for rapid deployment of resources necessary to facilitate recovery.

Hazard Control and Assessment

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This section should describe, in general, the capabilities and processes the jurisdiction has in place to identify, analyze, gain control of, and monitor hazards that may affect the jurisdiction. The response activities listed below normally take place at a scene. Not all emergency and disaster situations have a scene, so these activities apply to many but not all hazards. The first activity, which is to perceive the threat, applies to all hazards. The activities are ordered steps listed below. The following is sample language.)

Perceive the threat

Assess the hazard

Select control strategy

Control hazard

Monitor hazard

Protective Action Selection

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This section should describe, in general, the capabilities and processes the jurisdiction has in place to select protective action strategies and actions. The response activities listed below normally take place at an EOC. In some cases, information from the scene must be communicated to the EOC for these tasks to be done properly. Ordered steps for protective action selection are as follows. The following is sample language.)

Analyze the hazard

Determine protective action

Determine public warning

Determine protective action implementation plan

Public Warning

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This section should describe, in general, the capabilities and processes the jurisdiction has in place to disseminate public warning messages to the public as to the nature of the hazard, the timing, and the recommended or required protective actions the public should implement. The following is sample language.)

Determine message content

Select appropriate public warning system(s)

Disseminate public warning

Protective Action Implementation

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This section should describe, in general, the capabilities and processes the jurisdiction has in place to implement the range of protective actions that may be required for various hazards. The response activities listed below are examples of activities that may be required to implement protective actions in response to certain types of hazards. The following is sample language.)

Monitor progress of protective action implementation

Control access and isolate danger area

Evacuation support

Decontamination support

Medical treatment

Functional needs population support

Search and rescue

Short-term Needs

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This section should describe, in general, the capabilities and processes the jurisdiction has in place to address the short-term needs of the population once the population has been protected from the hazard. The response activities listed below are examples of activities that may be required in the early stages after a disaster has occurred. These activities can help stabilize the jurisdiction and the affected population. The following is sample language.)

Shelter operations

Unite families

Continued medical treatment

Increase security

Stabilize the affected area

Long-term Needs

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This section should describe, in general, the capabilities and processes the jurisdiction has in place to restore the jurisdiction and its affected population to a “normal” state. The response activities listed below are examples of activities that may be addressed in this section. The following is sample language.)

Re-entry

Recovery


Organization and Assignment of Responsibilities

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The organization and assignment of responsibilities section establishes the organizations and agencies that will be relied upon to respond to a disaster or emergency situation. This section also includes tasks that these organizations and agencies are expected to perform.
The following is sample language.)

0.
General

Most departments/agencies of government have emergency functions in addition to their normal, day-to-day duties. These emergency functions usually parallel or complement normal functions. Each department/agency is responsible for developing and maintaining its own emergency management procedures.

0. Organization

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The EOP should include the organizations and agencies that should be typically involved in an emergency. The EOP should ensure that any unique organizational arrangements pertinent to the emergency function are adequately described. Several strata of organizations should be included. Each organization should be listed separately and by its official title. The following is an example of the types of agencies and organizations included in many EOPs.)

Chief elected officials

Homeland security and emergency management agencies

Law enforcement agencies

Fire departments

Emergency medical services agencies

Health departments

Hospitals

Public works agencies

Departments of education

Legal department

Finance department

Local emergency planning committee

Office of family support or social services

0. Assignment of Responsibilities

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Primary and supporting emergency function responsibilities should be assigned to specific departments, agencies, and other organizations. The Basic Plan assigns general responsibilities for emergency functions during emergencies. These tasks should be clearly defined and assigned to the departments and agencies that have the capability to perform them. Coordination requirements should also be described. The assignment of responsibilities listed below is an example of what can be found in many emergency operations plans, but remember that each assignment of responsibilities list must be tailored for each particular jurisdiction. In order to be compliant with the National Incident Management System (NIMS), this section should pre-designate functional area representatives to the EOC or to work within the multi-agency coordination system. A simple statement indicating that each organization listed below will send a representative to the EOC upon activation of the EOP will ensure that the plan is NIMS compliant.)

Chief Elected Officials

Disaster declarations

Evacuation orders

Re-entry decisions

Other protective action decisions as necessary


Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agencies

EOC staffing and functioning

Communications

Operations of the shelter system in conjunction with the American Red Cross

Emergency public information

Alert and warning systems

Assistance from other jurisdictions

State assistance

Federal assistance

Emergency control and use of resources

Homeland security and emergency preparedness training and education

Rumor control

Damage assessment

Comprehensive homeland security and emergency preparedness planning


Law Enforcement Agencies

Maintaining law and order

Controlling traffic

Protecting vital installations

Controlling and limiting access to the scene of the disaster

Supplementing communications

Assisting with all evacuation efforts

Search and rescue


Fire Departments

Providing fire protection and the combating of fires

Search and rescue

Decontamination

Damage assessment


Emergency Medical Services Agencies

Emergency medical transportation

Emergency medical treatment

Triage or assisting with triage

Assisting with functional needs population evacuation


Health Departments

Emergency medical care information and coordination

Emergency hospital treatment information and coordination

Medical support to shelters

Health advisories

Identification of local health facilities, including hospitals, clinics, dialysis centers, and nursing or rehabilitation centers, and supplying and using medical and health items

Identification of functional needs populations, including the elderly and very young, and populations requiring specific life-saving services (e.g., dialysis or assistance with breathing)

Emergency interment coordination

Insect and rodent control

Pest control as required

Inoculations for the prevention of disease

Sanitation


Hospitals

Emergency medical care

Limited on-site decontamination

Hospital evacuation

Traditional hospital medical services

Public Works Agencies

Maintaining designated major streets and avenues, highways, and other designated routes of travel

Assisting with heavy rescue

Decontamination

Engineering services as required

Transportation

Debris removal

Inspection of shelter sites for safe occupancy

Inspection of damaged buildings, public and private, for safe occupancy

Enforcement of building codes

Maintenance of vehicles and other essential equipment of the various departments and agencies

Development of a plan of priorities to be used during the period of increased readiness that addresses the repair of vehicles and equipment

Maintenance of a reserve supply of fuel

Provisions for the immediate repair of emergency service vehicles and equipment, both in the field and in the shop, as the situation permits


Departments of Education

Providing the use of facilities for emergency public education

Providing facilities for emergency housing of evacuees and relief forces

Providing facilities for emergency first aid stations, emergency hospitals, or emergency morgues

Providing personnel for shelter managers and staff

Providing recreation plans for shelter occupants’ use during shelter-stay period

Coordinating transportation


Legal Department

Providing legal advice as required

Performing other necessary legal functions

Serving as a liaison with other legal and judicial agencies and sections of the government

Finance Department

Maintaining economic stabilization as required

Maintaining a list of suppliers, vendors, and items of critical emergency need (through the appropriate procurement division)

Local Emergency Planning Committee

Furnishing information, including maps or materials, as needed, for the emergency management agency or emergency preparedness coordinator. This includes Tier II reports and other industry-specific information to produce general detailed planning for chemical, transportation, or industrial accidents.

Augmenting EOC staff as necessary

Office of Family Support or Social Services

Supporting shelter managers

Emergency welfare services

Emergency lodging

Emergency feeding

Emergency clothing

Emergency registration and inquiry

Coordinating services for the area homeless population

Coordinating religious services

Coordinating private welfare groups

Identifying non-English-speaking persons and provisions for translation

Identifying functional needs population (by culture, language, or age-specific requirements)

Maintaining an up-to-date list and supporting memorandums of agreement (MOAs) with shelter facilities and their points of contact

Support Functions

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This section describes responsibilities or capabilities of other entities beyond direct jurisdictional control that are known to support, or are capable of supporting, disaster response or recovery within the jurisdiction. Examples of some support functions are shown below.)

2. Support from the National Guard may be requested through the State office of emergency management. Military assistance will complement and not be a substitute for local participation in emergency operations. Military forces will remain at all times under military command, but will support and assist response efforts.

Support from other State government departments and agencies may be made available in accordance with the State plan.

Private sector organizations within the jurisdiction may assist with a wide variety of tasks based on their capabilities.

Volunteer agencies, such as the American Red Cross, local church/synagogue congregations, and assistive organizations, such as the Salvation Army, are available to give assistance with sheltering, feeding, and other issues, as necessary.

Assistance from surrounding jurisdictions may be available through the execution of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) or MOA.

0. Continuity of Government

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This section should describe the essential elements of the EOP for maintaining continuity of government (COG) in the jurisdiction. If a separate plan has been developed for continuity of operations (COOP) and COG for the jurisdiction, this section should reference that plan. Effective comprehensive emergency management operations depend upon two important factors to ensure COG from the highest to lowest levels: (1) lines of succession for officials/agency heads/authorized personnel and (2) preservation of records. The following is sample language.)

Succession of Command

Describes the hierarchy of command succession at the State and local levels.

0. State Government Succession

This will be arranged in accordance with the State Constitution. In general, the line of succession may be designated in a manner similar to the following:

Governor

Lieutenant Governor

Secretary of State

Attorney General

Treasurer

Presiding Officer of the State

Presiding Officer of the House of Representatives

0. Local Government Succession

Each jurisdiction has its own local government succession that usually is referred to within the local EOP.

Relocation of Government

Each jurisdiction is responsible for designating facilities that will accommodate the relocation of government. Refer to local EOPs for individual jurisdictions.

Preservation of Records

State Level

Each agency/department is responsible for maintaining and recording all legal documents affecting the organization and administration of emergency management functions. It is the further responsibility of State officials to ensure that all records are secure and protected from elements of damage or destruction at all times.

Local Level

It is the responsibility of elected officials to ensure that all legal documents of both public and private nature recorded by the designated official (i.e., tax assessor, sheriff’s office) be protected and preserved in accordance with applicable State and local laws. Examples include ordinances, resolutions, meeting minutes, land deeds, and tax records.


Direction, Control, and Coordination

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This section should describe the framework for all direction, control, and coordination. The following is sample language.)


Authority to Initiate Actions

Describe who is responsible for activating the EOP. The decision will be made by the responsible public official(s) and the on-scene commander within the jurisdiction.

Assign responsibility for implementation of the EOP.



Command Responsibility for Specific Actions

General guidance of emergency operations

Assign responsibility for general guidance of emergency operations.

Direction of response

Responsible for overall direction of the disaster response activities of all of the jurisdiction’s departments and agencies. During emergencies, those responsibilities will be carried out normally from the EOC.

Each jurisdiction’s chief elected official has the responsibility for addressing threats to his or her jurisdiction. This authority shall include, but not be limited to, the declaration of an emergency condition or disaster declaration within the political jurisdiction.

Each homeland security and emergency preparedness director will act as the chief advisor to his jurisdiction’s chief elected official during any declared emergency affecting the people and property of the jurisdiction. Various agencies and departments under the direction of the jurisdiction’s homeland security and emergency preparedness agency director will conduct emergency operations.

In order to be NIMS compliant, information in this section should include, where required by law, that a State agency assumes command of an incident scene in this section. This section should also include information about the agency having designated personnel trained in the NIMS Incident Command System (ICS).

State and Federal officials will coordinate their operations through the jurisdiction’s elected or appointed officials or their designated representatives.

Incident Command System

The local incident command structures are responsible for directing on-scene emergency operations and maintaining command and control of on-scene incident operations. If a disaster affects multiple widely separated facilities or jurisdictions, separate incident command operations and an area command may be set up.

Assistance

If the jurisdiction’s own resources are insufficient or inappropriate to respond to the emergency situation, a request may be made for assistance from other jurisdictions, the State, or Federal government. All response agencies are expected to fulfill mission assignments directed by the incident commander.


Information Collection and Dissemination





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This section describes the required critical or essential information common to all operations identified during the planning process. In general terms, it identifies the type of information needed, where it is expected to come from, who uses the information, how the information is shared, the format for providing the information, and any specific times the information is needed.)

Disaster information managed by the
(Name of Jurisdiction) Emergency Operations Center is coordinated through agency representatives located in the EOC. These representatives collect information from and disseminate information to counterparts in the field. These representatives also disseminate information within the EOC that can be used to develop courses of action and manage emergency operations.

Detailed procedures that identify the type of information needed, where it is expected to come from, who uses the information, how the information is shared, the format for providing the information, and specific times the information is needed are maintained at the
(Name of Jurisdiction) Emergency Operations Center.

Communications

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This section describes communication protocols between response organizations and coordination procedures used during emergencies and disasters. It does not describe communications hardware or specific procedures found in departmental standard operating procedures (SOPs). The following is sample language.)

Communication protocols and coordination procedures are described in detail in the State Emergency Communications Plan. Please refer to this plan for additional information.


Administration, Finance, and Logistics

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This section should describe administration, finance, and logistics policies that support the implementation of the plan. At a minimum, this section should contain information about agreements and understandings that support regional response. The following is sample language.)

0.
General Policies

This section outlines general policies for administering resources, including the following:

Appointment of Officials

Identify the positions of officials who have been appointed to participate in the decision-making process.

Funding and Accounting

Reference should be made to administrative requirements that are applicable to emergency operations (e.g., emergency purchasing procedures), which appear in other documents.

Records and Reports

The plan should include requirements for tracking the source and use of resources and expenditures.

Responsibility for submitting local government reports to the State office of homeland security and emergency preparedness rests with each jurisdiction’s homeland security and emergency preparedness director.

Each jurisdiction’s homeland security and emergency preparedness director maintains records of expenditures and obligations in emergency operations. They should also support the collection and maintenance of narrative and long-type records of response to all declared disasters.

Agreements and Understandings

This section references any mutual aid agreements or emergency response and recovery contracts that exist. It also indicates who is authorized to activate those agreements or contracts.

Elements that should be addressed in MOA/MOUs include the following:

General

Emergency use of resources and capabilities of organizations that are not part of a government structure will be pre-arranged through agreements to the maximum extent feasible. Duly authorized officials will enter into agreements, which will be formalized in writing whenever possible.

Agreements between elements of the same government will be included in their respective plans. Details of such agreements, which are inappropriate for inclusion in these plans, will be set forth in an SOP, instructions, or other directives of the units of government concerned.

Unless otherwise provided, agreements remain in effect until rescinded or modified. Annual or other periodic updates will prevent them from becoming outdated.

A clear statement of agreement regarding payment reimbursement for personal services rendered, equipment costs, and expenditures of material is mandatory.

Agreements
Agreements with private relief organizations provide immediate aid to disaster victims and provide some types of aid that the government is unable to render.

Understandings
MOUs with adjoining counties or local governments recognize that certain situations require effective coordination and cooperation between jurisdictions to achieve effective response and provide for the general safety and health of residents. These documents formalize and focus attention on commitments and help avoid misunderstandings.

Assistance Stipulations

Local policies that have been established regarding the use of volunteers or accepting donated goods and services should be summarized. Elements that should be addressed in this section include:

Administration of insurance claims

Consumer protection

Duplication of benefits

Nondiscrimination

Relief assistance

Preservation of environment and historic properties

Additional Policies

When the resources of local government are exhausted or when a needed capability does not exist within a local government, the local units of government call for assistance from the State.

The incident commander will submit periodic situation reports to the appropriate authority during a major disaster using standard ICS formats.

Plan Development and Maintenance

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This section should describe the overall approach to plan development and maintenance. The following is sample language.)

0. Development

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Identify by position the individuals responsible for developing, revising, and approving the Basic Plan, annexes, appendices, and supplementary documents, such as checklists, SOPs, etc. The following is sample language.)

The State office of homeland security and the emergency preparedness coordinator are responsible for coordinating emergency planning.

The director of each jurisdiction’s homeland security and emergency preparedness agency is responsible for supporting emergency planning.

Maintenance

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The EOP is a living document. Problems emerge, situations change, gaps become apparent, Federal requirements are altered, and the EOP must be adapted to remain useful and up-to-date. This section identifies the requirements and the individuals responsible for maintaining, reviewing, and updating the Basic Plan, annexes, appendices, and supplementary documents, such as checklists, SOPs, etc. Once planning documents are developed, a system of maintenance must be established to ensure they are current. The following sub-sections provide an example of types of information that should be addressed in this section of the EOP, and is provided as a starting point for developing language for this section. The following is sample language.)

Requirements

The emergency management coordinator will maintain, distribute, and update the EOP. Responsible officials in State or local agencies should recommend changes and provide updated information periodically (e.g., changes of personnel and available resources). Revisions will be forwarded to people on the distribution list.

To comply with requirements outlined in Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulation 0654/FEMA-REP-1, the plans of jurisdictions located within the emergency planning zones with nuclear power plants must annually review, update (if needed), and certify plans to be current.

Directors of supporting agencies have the responsibility of maintaining internal plans, SOPs, and resource data to ensure prompt and effective response to and recovery from emergencies and disasters.

Review and Update

Review

The Basic Plan and its appendices should be reviewed annually by local officials. The emergency management coordinator or, if no coordinator has been appointed, the local chief elected official, should establish a process for the annual review of planning documents by those tasked in those documents, and for preparation and distribution of revisions or changes.

Update

Changes

Changes should be made to plans and appendices when the documents are no longer current. Changes in planning documents may be needed:

When hazard consequences or risk areas change

When the concept of operations for emergencies changes

When departments, agencies, or groups that perform emergency functions are reorganized and can no longer perform the emergency tasks laid out in planning documents

When warning and communications systems change

When additional emergency resources are obtained through acquisition or agreement, the disposition of existing resources changes, or anticipated emergency resources are no longer available

When a training exercise or an actual emergency reveals significant deficiencies in existing planning documents

When State/territorial or Federal planning standards for the documents are revised

Methods of updating planning documents

Plan Revision

A revision is a complete rewrite of an existing EOP or appendix that essentially results in a new document. Revision is advisable when numerous pages of the document have to be updated, when major portions of the existing document must be deleted or substantial text added, or when the existing document was prepared using a word processing program that is obsolete or no longer available. Revised documents should be given a new date and require new signatures by officials.

Formal Plan Change

A formal change to a planning document involves updating portions of the document by making specific changes to a limited number of pages. Changes are typically numbered to identify them, and are issued to holders of the document with a cover memorandum that has replacement pages attached. The cover memorandum indicates which pages are to be removed and which replacement pages are to be inserted in the document to update it. The person receiving the change is expected to make the required page changes to the document and then annotate the record of changes at the front of the document to indicate that the change has been incorporated into the document. A change to a document does not alter the original document date; new signatures on the document need not be obtained.


Authorities and References

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* Please delete these instructions before submitting *

This section should describe the legal basis for emergency operations and contain references to important documents the plan supports, such as the jurisdiction-level emergency operations plan. The following is sample language.)


Legal Authority

Federal

The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance, Public Law 93-288 as amended

Other executive orders and acts pertaining to disasters enacted or to be enacted

Public Employees Occupational Safety and Health Act (PEOSHA) regulations

State

Insert State laws pertaining to homeland security and emergency management.

Local

Insert applicable ordinances.

Volunteer, QuasiGovernmental

Act 5841905, American National Red Cross Statement of Understanding, December 30, 1985.


References

Federal

Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 101: Developing and Maintaining State, Territorial, Tribal, and Local Government Emergency Plans. Version 2. November 2010.

Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA) and Stakeholder Preparedness Review (SPR) Guide Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 201. 3rd Edition. May 2018.

Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP), January 2020.

National Incident Management System (NIMS). 3rd Edition. October 2017.

National Response Framework. Federal Emergency Management Agency. 4th Edition. October 2019.

State

State EOP

State map with homeland security and emergency management regions

Local

Local EOPs

Note: The template for this plan was adopted from the following resource:

Basic Emergency Operations Planning: Emergency Operations Basic Plan Template. (September 2009). National Preparedness Directorate (NPD). FEMA.

image1.jpeg

Due Date: 11:59 pm EST day of Unit 3
Points: 100

The Purpose, Scope, Situation and Assumptions of the Base Plan

Overview:

This is the beginning of your Course Project, the Base Plan.

Instructions:

You will use the Course Project template to write the Purpose, Scope, Situation &
Assumptions of the Base Plan. This includes completion of the title page, promulgation
statement, signature page, and approval and implementation page.

You will be using the Course Project Template below throughout the span of this
course. You will be working on this document in each unit and will complete it by the
end of the course. Part 1 is due by the end of Unit 3.

Be sure to read the criteria below by which your work will be evaluated before
you write and again after you write.

EMH490: Emergency Plan Project

Unit 3 Assignment: Course Project, Part I

Copyright 2022 Post University, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Evaluation Rubric for Unit 3 Assignment

CRITERIA Exemplary Accomplished Satisfactory Unsatisfactory
10 points 8 – 9 points 6 – 7 points 0 – 5 points
Title Page The Title page

is filled out with
all required
information.

The Title page is
present, but
minor details are
missing.

The Title page is
present, but key
details are
missing.

The Title page
is missing or
poorly
presented.

25 points 20– 24 points 15 – 19points 0 – 14 points
Promulgation
Statement

The
Promulgation
Statement is
filled out with all
required
information.

The
Promulgation
Statement is
present, but
minor details are
missing.

The
Promulgation
Statement is
present, but key
details are
missing.

The
Promulgation
Statement is
missing or
poorly
presented.

Signature Page The Signature
page is filled out
with all required
information.

The Signature
page is present,
but minor details
are missing.

The Signature
page is present,
but key details
are missing.

The Signature
page is missing
or poorly
presented.

Approval and
Implementation
Page

The Approval
and
Implementation
page is filled out
with all required
information.

The Approval
and
Implementation
page is present,
but minor details
are missing.

The Approval
and
Implementation
page is present,
but key details
are missing.

The Approval
and
Implementation
page is missing
or poorly
presented.

15 points 12 – 14 points 9 – 11 points 0 – 8 points
Clear and
Professional
Writing

Writing and
format are clear
and
professional.

Few errors that
do not impede
professional
presentation.

Significant errors
that do not
impede
professional
presentation.

Errors impede
professional
presentation.

Copyright 2022 Post University, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

  • The Purpose, Scope, Situation and Assumptions of the Base Plan
    • Overview:
    • Instructions:
    • Evaluation Rubric for Unit 3 Assignment
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