Paper two

We're the ideal place for homework help. If you are looking for affordable, custom-written, high-quality and non-plagiarized papers, your student life just became easier with us. Click either of the buttons below to place your order.


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper

Policy Analysis

Introduction

Organizational policy alignment and adherence to laws and regulations is critical for overall corporate compliance and to decrease organizational risks (patient falls, medication errors, cyber hacks and PHI data breaches, infection control, et cetera). In this assignment, you will select, evaluate, and update one health care provider’s policy related to a significant regulatory risk to the health care organization.

Instructions 

Select one of two options:

Option A

If you work for a hospital or health care organization you may select a policy that is of interest to you then follow these assignment instructions:

  • Imagine you are a health care administrator at your current employer. Analyze the policy you selected, taking into consideration any recent changes. Evaluate what information and where that information would need to be updated. Propose revisions that are based on current identified standards and/or new guidelines that you have researched in the text or identified in other high-quality sources (that is, journals, government websites, and the like). Analyze the significance of the selected policy updates as it relates to potential litigation. (Why did the policy need updating? What threats do these changes help avoid?) Summarize your perspective on the revisions as well as any additional changes that should be considered. Present your work as an executive summary suitable for distribution to your organization’s board members.
Option B

If you do not work in the industry or do not have access to a health care policy, use the  Hahnemann Falls Policy to complete this assignment. Then follow these assignment instructions:

  • As you can see, this policy was written in 2012. Now, imagine you are a health care administrator working at the health care organization where this policy originates from. Analyze the policy, taking into consideration the changes in HIPAA and PHI since 2012. Evaluate what information and where that information would need to be updated for a current revision of this document. Locate the areas where you would update or add information to this 2012 version. Propose revisions that are based on current identified standards and/or new guidelines that you have researched in the text or identified in other high-quality sources (that is, journals, government websites, and the like). Analyze the significance of the selected policy updates as it relates to potential litigation. (Why did the policy need updating? What threats do these changes help avoid?) Summarize your perspective on the revisions as well as any additional changes that should be considered. Present your work as an executive summary suitable for distribution to your organization’s board members.

Your paper should be 3–5 pages long and should include a title page and references for a total of 5–7 pages.

Running Head: POLICY ANALYSIS 1

Assignment #2 EXAMPLE

Policy Analysis

POLICY ANALYSIS

2

Analyze a problematic or dated health care policy, explaining its primary purpose and

effectiveness.

Hospital-acquired infections (HAI) can cause serious complications in patients during

their hospital stay, HAI is also associated with an increase in the length of hospital stay, higher

cost in stay and some extreme cases can even cause death. “Approximately 720,000 healthcare-

associated infections (HAIs) occur annually in the United States (U.S.) and the medical costs

associated with treating these HAIs can exceed 9 billion dollars annually” (Stouse 2015).

Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI) are infections associated with indwelling

urinary catheters (UC), also known as Foley catheters. An indwelling urinary catheter (UC) is

defined in Policy C-193 “as a drainage tube that is inserted into the urinary bladder through the

urethra, is left in place, and is connected to a drainage bag (including leg bags). These devices

are also called Foley catheters”. The purpose of indwelling urinary catheters: to monitor

critically ill patients requiring hourly Ins and Outs, assisting with wound healing in incontinent

patients, bladder obstruction or acute urinary retention, lumbar epidurals, prolonged

immobilization (e.g. pelvic fractures, trauma, unstable thoracic and lumbar spine surgeries or

injuries), urological surgery or any surgery that consists of structures within the genitourinary

tract and colorectal structures, bladder trauma and/or undergoing abdominal pressure

monitoring or a patient at end of life measures.

CAUTI is the most common type of healthcare-associated infection and is preventable

through the limited use of indwelling urinary catheters (UC), proper insertion methods, and

diligent maintenance practices. Due to the high infection rates associated with indwelling urinary

catheters (UC) C-193, CAUTI PREVENTION policy is being analyzed.

POLICY ANALYSIS

3

Determine the issues the selected policy poses as it is written and any related ramifications.

“CAUTIs account for approximately 35% to 40% of all HAIs in the U.S. and cost health

care organizations $150 to $450 million annually to treat. Every day an indwelling catheter

remains in place, the risk for infection increases 3% to 5%, and each CAUTI event can extend a

patient’s length of stay an additional 0.5 to 1.0 hospital days”(Strouse 2015). Also, health care

organizations are not reimbursed for hospital-acquired infections, and hospitals can even be

penalized with Medicare reductions.

Policy C-193, CAUTI Prevention, was written 10/1/2013 and was last revised 11/15/2017. Due

to the increase in the number of Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI) related to indwelling urinary

catheters (UC), we must update the policy with new Evidence-Based Practice research to ensure

patient safety and help decrease our Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections. The policy

states for maintenance of an indwelling urinary catheter perform peri-care with soap or non-

antimicrobial wipes at least every twelve hours and with each fecal incontinence episode. Refer

to Mosby’s clinical practice guidelines for peri-care technique.

One question this policy pose is, will just be cleaning the catheter line with soap or a non-

antimicrobial wipe with each fecal incontinence every 12-hours be enough to help prevent

infections with a patient with an indwelling urinary catheter/foley? Patients with urinary tract

infections (UTI) can have complications such as extreme pain, cystitis, pyelonephritis, and

prostatitis. In older populations UTI’s can lead to patients becoming confused, increasing the risk

for falling, and in severe cases, the infection can spread to other organs and even cause sepsis

can occur.

POLICY ANALYSIS

4

Research the changes needed to update and align the policy with current standards and

guidelines.

Chlorhexidine (CHG) is an abroad-spectrum antimicrobial. It is effective against Gram-

positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and fungi. These organisms are often associated with

Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs) (Chlorhexidine Facts). Chlorhexidine has many

benefits and has been used with many healthcare products. Due to the bactericidal properties of

Chlorhexidine (CHG), it has become the standard of care in health care organizations for

infection prevention and reduction. Giving a patient a daily Chlorhexidine bath has shown to

reduce and prevent hospital-acquired infections. Chlorhexidine’s antimicrobial properties, and

incorporating a daily Chlorhexidine bath into the maintenance of a patient with an indwelling

urinary catheter hopefully will help reduce and prevent patients from getting a Catheter-

Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI).

Propose revisions that are based on current identified standards and/or new guidelines.

Policy C-193, CAUTI Prevention, will update section D. Maintenance of Indwelling

Urinary Catheters. Section D, Maintenance of Indwelling states: “1. Review and document the

need for the indwelling UC at least daily; remove if no longer indicated per the Nurse-Driven

Indwelling Catheter Discontinuation Protocol 2. To prevent catheter movement, ensure that the

catheter is secure using a hospital-approved securement device. 3. To prevent contamination and

the backflow of urine, keep the urinary bag off of the floor and below the level of the patient’s

bladder. 4. Position the urinary system to always drain away from the patient with no dependent

loops or kinks in the tubing. 5. Utilize the attached clip to direct urine flow. 6. Maintain the

urinary catheter system as a closed system and avoid opening the system/changing the urine

collection bag when possible. 7. If the closed system is compromised, remove the catheter, and

POLICY ANALYSIS

5

replace it if indicated. 8. Perform peri-care with soap or non-antimicrobial wipes at least every

twelve hours and with each fecal incontinence episode. Refer to Mosby’s clinical practice

guidelines for peir-care technique. 9. Ensure that the catheter drainage bag is no greater than 2/3

full and empty before patient transport. 10. Use a single, dedicated measuring container (e.g.

graduated cylinder, urinal) to empty” (MUSC Policy C-193).

Along with these 10 other guidelines to maintain a proper indwelling urinary catheter,

there were be a few more additions. Guideline 11. Perform a daily linen change and

Chlorhexidine (CHG) bath with the liquid solution or Chlorhexidine wipes every 24 hours.

Document the time of bath appropriately in the daily care section of the patient’s flow sheet

under the Hygiene Care tab.

Analyze the significance of the selected policy updates as it relates to potential litigation.

The Medical University of South Carolina Policy C-193 clearly identifies the indications

necessary for a patient to have an indwelling urinary catheter. It states the proper way to insert an

indwelling catheter on either a male or female and the maintenance care of a catheter after it’s

been inserted on a patient. All these steps must be followed correctly and charted to deliver the

best quality and safe handling of care for the patient with an indwelling urinary catheter. If a

nurse fails to insert an indwelling catheter precisely or does not keep up with the proper care and

maintenance this can cause harm to the patient and leave the health care facility liable due to

negligent care of the nurse. Corporate negligence occurs when a health care facility fails to

perform the standard of duties owed to the patient to make sure the patient is safe during their

stay at the hospital. If a patient is harmed or injured as a result of the broken standard of care, the

health care facility is held responsible under the concept of corporate negligence (Pozgar p.184).

POLICY ANALYSIS

6

Summarize a personal perspective on the revisions as well as any additional changes that

should be considered.

With the hospital-acquired infection rates going up recently, updating the policy C-193

for CAUTI prevention is a must. Every day that a catheter is in place increases the risk of up to

5%. If a hospital-acquired infection occurs, this can lead to a longer length of stay, a higher

medical cost for the healthcare facility as well the facility can be penalized with Medicare

reductions. Chlorhexidine has many health benefits due to the bactericidal properties making

Chlorhexidine a logical choice to add to the CAUTI prevention maintenance bundle. Not only

does Chlorhexidine promote a daily bath for patients, but it will also help reduce infection rates

and prevent further hospital-acquired infections that could be caused by indwelling urinary

catheters or other invasive lines.

POLICY ANALYSIS

7

References:

Medical University Policy C-193 (2013).

George D. Pozgar. 2019. Legal Aspects of Health Care Administration (13th ed.). Jones &

Bartlett Learning

Strouse, Abigail, MS, RN & ACNS-BC, NEA-BC. (2015). CNE: Appraising the Literature On

Bathing Practices And Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Prevention. Urologic

Nursing, 35, 11-17. https://doi.org/10.7257/1053-816X.2015.35.1.11

Frost, S. A., Hou, Y. C., Lombardo, L., Metcalfe, L., Lynch, J. M., Hunt, L., Alexandrou, E.,

Brennan, K., Sanchez, D., Aneman, A., & Christensen, M. (2018). Evidence for the

effectiveness of chlorhexidine bathing and health care-associated infections among adult

intensive care patients: a trial sequential meta-analysis. BMC infectious diseases, 18(1),

679. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-018-3521-y

Huang, H. P., Chen, B., Wang, H. Y., & He, M. (2016). The efficacy of daily chlorhexidine

bathing for preventing healthcare-associated infections in adult intensive care units. The

Korean Journal of internal medicine, 31(6), 1159–1170.

https://doi.org/10.3904/kjim.2015.240

Chlorhexidine Facts. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://chlorhexidinefacts.com/

Patient Care Policy 7.011

Subject:

Falls Prevention and
Resource

Sponsor: Risk Management

Effective Date: April 2002
Revised: May 2013
Reviewed: May 2013
Review Due: February 2014

Reference: Noted at end of policy. Page 1 of 7

I. PURPOSE:

The purpose of this policy is to:

Establish guidelines for mitigating the risk of patient falls

Establish a framework for assessing risk factors for patient falls, implementing intervention for
reducing the risk for falling, and protecting patients from injury if a fall should occur.

Establish guidelines for the prevention of patient falls through the practice of diligent assessment,
ongoing communication and appropriate proactive action.

Establish guidelines to define action in the event of a fall and complete the required follow-up
assessments and documentation.

Establish guidelines for staff to retain responsibility for patient safety at all times even if family is
present.

This policy pertains to all patient care settings within Hospital.

II. DEFINITIONS and RISK FACTORS:

A. Accidental Fall: Fall that occurs unintentionally (example: slip, trip). Patients at risk for these falls
cannot be identified prior to a fall and generally do not score at risk for falling on a predictive
instrument.

B. Unanticipated Physiological Fall: Fall that occurs when the physical cause of the fall is not
reflected in the patient‟s assessed risk factors for falls. These falls are created by conditions that
cannot be predicted before their first occurrence (example: seizure, stroke).

C. Anticipated Physiological Fall: Fall that occurs in patients whose risk factor score indicated the
patient is at risk of falling. Controlled sliding down a wall to the ground or utilization of a physiologic
structure is considered a fall. These falls are related to existing and previous risk factors.

D. Intentional Fall: Fall that occurs as a result of a patient who voluntarily alters body position to a
lower level.

E. Factors which may increase risk for falls:

Fear of falling

Age

History of previous fall

Auditory impairment

Visual impairment

History of fracture

History of bleeding disorder

Use of restraints

Obesity

Hypoglycemia

Difficulty understanding/retaining instructions

Mobility/gait impairment

Sensory impairment

Dizziness

Dehydration

Patient Care Policy 7.011

Subject:

Falls Prevention and
Resource

Sponsor: Risk Management

Effective Date: April 2002
Revised: May 2013
Reviewed: May 2013
Review Due: February 2014

Reference: Noted at end of policy. Page 2 of 7

Language barrier

Taking high risk medications

Use of assistive devices (walker, cane, crutches, etc.)

Orthostatic hypotension

F. Secondary diagnoses which may increase risk for falls include, but are not limited to:

Transient ischemic attack

Parkinson‟s disease

Musculoskeletal deformities or myopathy

Bowel/bladder incontinence/frequent toileting

Congestive heart failure

Stroke

Diabetes

Dementia

Alzheimer‟s

Delirium

Agitation

Epilepsy

Withdrawals

Cardiac arrhythmia

Depression/anxiety

Constipation

Osteoporosis

G. Special Considerations:

Surgical patients may have an abnormal gait up to 24 hours post anesthesia

Hypovolemia (for example, obstetrical patients)

Psychiatric patients may fall from medications and diagnosis

Intensive care patients who get out of bed may also be restless

Gero-psych patients are at highest risk for falls

Forensic shackled patients may be at risk

III. POLICY:

Falls can be a source of serious injuries to patients within healthcare facilities. The assessment and accompanying
measures are designed to prevent and /or reduce the number and severity of falls. The ultimate goal of a falls
program is prevention of injury. This hospital will take steps to reduce the number and severity of patient falls by:

V. PROCEDURE:

A. Initial Falls Risk Assessment

1. Upon entry into the hospital system or through emergency services, a registered nurse will
complete the Morse Fall Scale Risk Screening Tool in the electronic medical record as part
of the initial admission assessment per facility policy.

2. For Ambulatory Services, please see the Ambulatory Falls Screening section of this policy

3. The Functional Screening section of the Initial Assessment is completed by the admitting
registered nurse. A physician order for therapy services must be obtained for Physical
Therapy, Occupational Therapy or Speech Therapy.

Patient Care Policy 7.011

Subject:

Falls Prevention and
Resource

Sponsor: Risk Management

Effective Date: April 2002
Revised: May 2013
Reviewed: May 2013
Review Due: February 2014

Reference: Noted at end of policy. Page 3 of 7

B. Falls Risk Assessments

A Falls Risk Assessment will be completed by a registered nurse to determine if a patient is at risk
for falls. The proper order for determining the patient‟s fall risk shall be:

1. Morse Scale Assessment:

a. Patients who score 0-24 are considered at “Low Risk” for falls.

b. Patients who score 25-44 on the Morse Scale are considered “Moderate Risk” for
falls.

c. Patients who score 45 and above are considered “High Risk” for falls.

d. Diagnoses that may be treated with medications which may potentially place the
patient at an increased risk for falls.

e. Individually prescribed high risk medications as well as multiple medications may
place the patient at a higher than normal risk for falls.

f. If there is/are secondary diagnos(es) listed, the medication classifications related
to the secondary diagnos(es) will be the determinant of the potential falls risk.
Table A “Medication Classifications” provides some of the highest risk medication
classes that place the patient at highest risk for falls.

Table A: Medication Classifications

Anti-seizure medications Laxatives Sedative/hypnotics

Benzodiazepines Narcotic analgesics Blood Thinners*

Diuretics Psychotropics
Skeletal muscle
relaxants

Sedating Antihistamine

*Blood thinners may include but are not limited to: anticoagulants, aspirin, over the
counter herbal agents which may impact clotting times.

C. Medication Classification Assessment

1. If the patient is prescribed medications from the Medication Classification List (Table A),
the patient may be considered to be “At Risk” for falls.

2. Patients who are administered blood thinners may be considered to be “at risk” for falls.

3. Interventions and medication management interventions shall be planned and
implemented and documented according to each patient‟s risk level and individual needs.
These will be documented in the electronic medical record. . I.

D. An additional follow-up assessment of patient‟s fall risk level must be completed at the following
times and must include all of the following:

every shift

with a change in status

upon transfer to a higher level of care

with administration of new medications identified as creating high risk for falls

following completion of procedures requiring medications that are often associated
with fall risk

Patient Care Policy 7.011

Subject:

Falls Prevention and
Resource

Sponsor: Risk Management

Effective Date: April 2002
Revised: May 2013
Reviewed: May 2013
Review Due: February 2014

Reference: Noted at end of policy. Page 4 of 7

as condition warrants reassessment such as change in mental status and
increased confusion

with a change in primary nurse

E. The follow-up assessment will be documented on the Morse Fall Scale. This information should be
updated every shift or more frequently as needed.

3. New information from follow-up fall risk assessments should also be reflected in the
electronic medical record documentation AND the Interdisciplinary Plan of Care.

F. Mandatory Fall Alert Interventions

1. All patients identified as “High Risk” for falls should have Falling STAR intervention
implemented to alert other healthcare workers, family and visitors of the fall potential.

2. All patients reporting a history of falling within the past three months and/or have fallen
during current hospitalization will require a bed check.

The following measures will be considered:

“Low and Moderate” Risk Interventions:

a. Patients will be offered toileting facilities close to patient offering assistance with toileting
every hour while awake.

b. Assign patients to beds that permit exiting on patient‟s stronger side when possible.

c. Utilize bed and/or chair alarms if appropriate

d. Periodic re-orientation

e. Referrals to appropriate disciplines such as Physical Therapy

f. Involve patient in diversional activity -1:1 consideration when indicated

“High” Risk Interventions:

a) Implement all clinically appropriate low and moderate risk Interventions.

b) High Risk patients scoring 45 or higher on the Morse Fall Scale will follow the Falling Star
Program and have yellow colored armband placed on the wrist, a yellow colored sign with a
star on the patient‟s door and above the patient‟s bed, and yellow no slip/skid socks applied to
serve as identifier‟s/preventative measure for the entire health care team.

c) Use a bed check device as warranted by patient‟s clinical status and history of falls. See unit-
specific fall policy for Psychiatric Medical Care Unit (PMCU).

d) Patient Fall Risk status will be reported during each opportunity for “Hand-Off Communication”:
shift report, communication with other departments for testing or procedures, or upon transfer

e) Patients who are on strict bed rest do not need to wear the no-slip/ skid socks.

f) Evaluate patient‟s hydration status, which research evidence has shown to be a factor in a
patient‟s risk for falls.

g) Make sure the bed is secured and locked in low position; call light within reach and 2-3 side
rails up.

h) Evaluate medications to reduce the potential risk of injury from falls.

Patient Care Policy 7.011

Subject:

Falls Prevention and
Resource

Sponsor: Risk Management

Effective Date: April 2002
Revised: May 2013
Reviewed: May 2013
Review Due: February 2014

Reference: Noted at end of policy. Page 5 of 7

G. Environmental Considerations

1. Patient care areas should be assessed during periodic safety tours to identify
environmental factors which may contribute to patient falls.

2. Environmental fall risk assessments should be completed periodically even if a specific unit
or population has previously been assessed and determined to present minimal fall risk.

3. When assessing environmental fall risk factors, consider the types of patients served, the
services provided and the physical environment (e.g., is the population elderly, mobile,
post-surgical, etc.).

3. Environmental fall risk reduction assessment should be integrated into existing Fall Risk
Reduction Programs.

I. Post-Fall Management:

1. Assess for injury (e.g., abrasion, contusion, laceration, fracture, head injury, bleeding). If
patient fell forward and hit chin, consider neck injury and handle patient to assume this until
physician notification. If patient has injury, notify Fall Alert by calling code line 80 to assess
patient and lead post falls huddle. Completed “Post Fall Assessment Form” will be
forwarded to Facility Falls Champion by Fall Team leader.

2. Obtain radiologic studies and lab tests as indicated by physician or licensed independent
practitioner.

3. Complete Post-Fall Assessment Form and return to immediate supervisor

4. Obtain vital signs, a physical assessment and neuro checks after every fall according to
the following sequence:

Every 15 minutes x 4; every 30 min x2, every 1 hour x 2; every 2 hours x2 then
every 4 hours x 48 hours

If vital signs are critical or the patient is deteriorating continue vital signs every 15
minutes and call the physician and the Rapid Response Team

Place patient on bed check and assess availability to move patient closer to the
nurse‟s station.

5. Notification of fall:

physician (if not previously called)

patient‟s emergency contact

6. Objective documentation in the medical record should include, but is not limited to:

description of the fall episode

name of notified physician

actions taken to reduce risk of concurrent falls

7. Monitor patient as condition warrants per policy

8. Report the fall to the charge nurse and at shift reports

9. Complete an Incident Report through eSRM.

10. Modify the Interdisciplinary Plan of Care as patient‟s condition warrants

11. Risk Management and Unit Director to follow up for latent injury on day four post fall and
update Incident report if necessary.

Patient Care Policy 7.011

Subject:

Falls Prevention and
Resource

Sponsor: Risk Management

Effective Date: April 2002
Revised: May 2013
Reviewed: May 2013
Review Due: February 2014

Reference: Noted at end of policy. Page 6 of 7

12. Post-Fall Management for those patients who are on blood thinners:

a. Notify physician immediately for head injury to determine if radiologic studies (i.e.,
CT scan, MRI) are needed.

13. If an injury has occurred, regardless of location, a Root Cause Analysis meeting will be
scheduled.. This will include primary staff caring for the patient, manager of area, CNO,
risk manager, falls champion and other staff as falls champion determines.

14. The post falls assessment form will be transmitted electronically to corporate risk
management and the respective Senior Director of Patient Care Services (SDPCS).

J. Ambulatory Care Screening

Ambulatory care setting at Hahnemann University Hospital are defined as Heart Failure, Antenatal
Testing Unit, Radiation Oncology, Blood Donor Center, 4 North Tower Pre-procedure, 9 Main,
Sleep Center, Pulmonary Function Laboratory, Endoscopy, Cardiac Care Center, Outpatient
Oncology, and Abdominal Transplant Services. Patients presenting to the above ambulatory care
settings will be screened for risk for falls by the point of care personnel. In the above ambulatory
services areas, patients are screened for risk for falls by observing the patient‟s ability to stand and
walk on their own and through interview utilizing the following questions:

1. Do you have trouble standing

2. Do you have trouble walking on your own

3. Do you have trouble dressing or undressing yourself? For those areas that require hospital
gown for examination)

4. Do you currently use a wheelchair, walker, cane or anything else to help you walk?

If the care provider determines the patient will have difficulty, or, if the patient answers „yes‟ to any
of the questions, the care provider will provide assistance to the patient during transfers and
treatment and offer a wheelchair if appropriate.

For those patients not at increased risk for falls, the ambulatory care services areas will follow
standard safety measures including, but not limited to periodic safety tours, maintaining
unobstructed and clean pathways, and ensuring safe room set up.

A facility developed screening tool will be completed in these areas and placed in patient‟s records.

O. Responsible Person

The Falls Champion shall be responsible for assuring that all Hospital staff adhere to the
requirements of this policy, that these procedures are implemented and followed at the Hospital,
and that instances of noncompliance with this policy are reported to the Chief Nursing Officer.

P. Auditing and Monitoring

The Clinical Quality Department shall audit adherence to this policy in its Comprehensive Clinical
Audits. Audit Services shall audit adhere to this policy in its full scope audits.

Q. Enforcement

All Hospital staff and Medical Staff Members whose responsibilities are affected by this policy are
expected to be familiar with the basic procedures and responsibilities created by this policy. Failure
to comply with this policy will be subject to appropriate performance management pursuant to all
applicable policies and procedures, including the Medical Staff Bylaws, Rules and Regulations.

Patient Care Policy 7.011

Subject:

Falls Prevention and
Resource

Sponsor: Risk Management

Effective Date: April 2002
Revised: May 2013
Reviewed: May 2013
Review Due: February 2014

Reference: Noted at end of policy. Page 7 of 7

VI. REFERENCES:

– Cooper, C, Nolt, J (2007) Development of an Evidence-based Pediatric Fall Prevention Program, Journal of Nursing Care
Quality 22(2), 107-112.

– Graf, E. (2004). General Risk Assessment for Pediatric Inpatient Falls Scale Worksheet (GRAF-PIF). Fall Risk Assessment
Tool, Children‟s Memorial Medical Center.

– Hendrich, A, Kippenbrock, T, et al, (1995). Hospital Falls: Development of a Predictive Model of Clinical Practice. Applied
Nursing Research, 8. 129-139.

– McGreevey, M (2005, September). Examining inpatient pediatric falls: Understanding the reasons and finding the solutions,
Joint Commission Perspectives on Patient Safety, 5(9), 5-6.

– Morse, J. Enhancing the Safety of Hospitalization by Reducing Patient Falls. American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 30 (6),
October, 2002, pg. 376-380.

– Rawsky, E. (1998). Review of the Literature on Falls among the Elderly. Image, 30(1), 47-2.

– Razmus, I, Wilson, D, Smith, R, Newman, E (2006) Falls in Hospitalized Children, Pediatric Nursing 32(6), 568–572.

– Stefler, C., Corrigan, B., Sander-Buscami, K., Burns, M. Integration of Evidence into Practice and the Change Processes: Fall
Prevention Program as a Model. Outcomes Management in Nursing Practice. July/Sep., 1999, pg 102-111.

– VA National Center for Patient Safety (NCPS). (2000). NCPS Concept Dictionary.

– Attachment F: Children Are at Risk of Falling While Hospitalized

APPROVALS:

Medical Executive Committee: June 2013

Administration: June 2013

Michael P. Halter
Chief Executive Officer

Writerbay.net

Do you need academic writing help? Our quality writers are here 24/7, every day of the year, ready to support you! Instantly chat with a customer support representative in the chat on the bottom right corner, send us a WhatsApp message or click either of the buttons below to submit your paper instructions to the writing team.


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper
Writerbay.net