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 Please see page 7. A Research paper is being compiled week by week. It would be helpful if Mass Incarceration is a interest and expertise to the writer. See page 7 on the attachment, Section a-c has been completed. Section D-I and the Appendix has to be completed. 

Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Political Science Program

4200 Connecticut Avenue NW | Washington, DC 20008 | 202.274.7403 | www.udc.edu

Senior Seminar

Course Number: POLI 498-01 CRN 20278 (3 credits)

Semester: Spring 2021; Class Time: T 5:30-8:20pm and by appointment

Class Location: Emergency Remote Virtual

Instructor: Dr. Guy F. Shroyer

E-mail: [email protected]

Office Hours: Weekly by appointment

I. Course Description: This course applies skills learned in POLI 295 Political Research Skills
and POLI 497 Methods of Political Science, involving completion of a professional-level

Political Science research paper. Professional-level is defined as a research paper that could be

submitted to a refereed Political Science professional journal. The course requires students to

demonstrate understanding and knowledge of the scientific method as it is applied in the analysis

of a manageable research problem in Political Science.

Pre-Requisites: Poli 295 (Political Research Skills) and Poli 497 (Methods of Political Science)

Course Rationale: Required Course for the Political Science Program

Course Objective: This course will enable the student to use the skills acquired in POLI 295 and

497 and allow them to demonstrate their understanding of scientific methods and social inquiry

by designing and carrying out a manageable research project and the completion of a formal

research paper (final report).

Student Objective: This course will enable students the opportunity to engage in an advanced

level of scientific inquiry by focusing upon a research project that results in the completion and

submission of a professional quality paper, a presentation and defense.

Instructional Methodology: This course will meet synchronously online for approximately 10

in-group classroom meetings in addition to weekly consultations by appointment. Throughout

the semester, students are required to schedule virtual meetings with the instructor (number and

dates TBD). At these meetings, we will work through questions and problems regarding your

individual projects and address the scope and progress of your research and writing. We will use

Blackboard and WebEx as media of communication and Blackboard as the exclusive modality

for turning in assigned work. We will come together as a group near the end of the semester to

present your projects on a senior panel.

2

II. Program Objectives and Student Learning Outcomes:
Program Objectives Student Leaning Outcomes Corresponding Classwork,

Assignments

Assessments

1.0 Understand major

concepts, methods and

theories useful for
analyzing political and

social problems

1.0 Describe research topic

and question with clarity

Student will produce and

elaborate upon a formal social

scientific research question

Timely completion of the stages of

the project, completion of the

research report and formal
presentation

2.0 Development of
proficiency in analytical

and research skills

through completion of a
senior research project

2.0 Illustrate which method is
being employed to answer the

research question

Students will be advised as to
theoretical and methodological

decisions necessary to optimize

their project

Timely completion of the stages of
the project, completion of the

research report and formal

presentation

3.0 Prepare students for

advanced studies in
graduate and law school,

as well as for

employment in the public
and private sectors

3.0 Depict and analyze data

carefully and
comprehensively;

Mentoring and consultation will

take place throughout the
semester through the process of

analytical interpretation and

presenting professional
scholarly work

Timely completion of the stages of

the project, completion of the

research report and formal

presentation

3.0 Prepare students for

advanced studies in

graduate and law school,
as well as for

employment in the public

and private sectors

4.0 Present research to peers

and defend research design

orally

Mentoring and consultation will

take place throughout the

semester through the process of
analytical interpretation and

presenting professional

scholarly work

Timely completion of the stages of

the project, completion of the

research report and formal
presentation

III. Course Requirements

Textbook:

Required: Available in Blackboard Course Content Section

Style Manual for Political Science. Revised 2006 Washington, DC: American Political Science

Association. ISBN: 1-87814-733-1.

A. Course Content: Learning Outcomes 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 will be addressed in the course of

student research, analysis, writing and oral presentation.

B. Class Attendance Policy: Attendance at scheduled virtual meetings is absolutely required.

There will be no exception to this policy.

C. Written Work Must Be Submitted Via Blackboard:

All written work for this class must conform to the following guidelines:

• All written work must be typed, double-spaced with one-inch margins, and in twelve
point font. Use of APSA style for all writing assignments is required unless otherwise

specified by the instructor.

• All papers should have a cover page. The cover page has the title of the paper centered at
the top of the page, in twelve-point font. It also includes the student’s name and the name

of the course.

• All pages except the cover page should be numbered in a consistent manner. If the
numbering is in the center it should be that way throughout the paper.

3

D. Deadlines: Students are expected to submit all assignments via Blackboard in a timely

manner.

IV. Formats and Procedures

Instructional Delivery: The method of instructional delivery for this course is virtual online

“Emergency Remote” held by course schedule or by appointment through Blackboard and other

university-provided platforms.

V. Student Resources:

❖ Blackboard. “From http://udc.blackboard.com, you can review and complete

assignments, view your grades, send messages to your professor or your classmates,

access course content, print another syllabus, or read sample essays.”

❖ UDC Email. All students must use a UDC e-mail account. UDC e-mail is the only e-mail

for academic use and will be the address that instructors use to communicate with

students from inside Blackboard.

❖ Student Manual and Academic Policies and Procedures Manual (available on

my.udc.edu)

VI. Course Schedule and Alignment:

Topics and dates SLOs Readings/Assignments Assessment

Module I: Thesis

Chapter1

Weeks 1-3

1.0 Describe research topic

and question with clarity

Working Group review and sharing

of comments

Draft of Ch. 1

Module II: Thesis

Chapters 2

Weeks 4-5

2.0 Illustrate which

method is being employed

to answer the research
question

Working Group review and sharing

of comments

Draft of Ch. 2

Chapter 3

Weeks 6-7

2.0 Illustrate which

method is being employed
to answer the research

question

Working Group review and sharing

of comments

Draft of Ch. 3

Module III: Thesis

Chapter 4

Weeks 8-9

3.0 Depict and analyze

data carefully and
comprehensively

Working Group review and sharing

of comments

Draft of Ch. 4

Module IV: Thesis

Chapters 5-6

Weeks 10-11

3.0 Depict and analyze

data carefully and

comprehensively

Working Group review and sharing

of comments

Draft of Chs. 5-6

First Draft of Thesis due

March 30

Partial Thesis grade

Final Draft
.of Thesis due April 6

Thesis grade

Presentations April 6-20 4.0 Present research to

peers and defend research
design orally

Presentation grade

4

VII. Assessment Procedures and Alignment:

Alignment of SLOs, Course materials and Assessment Instruments

Student Learning Outcomes Addressed

in this Course

Course Content that Allows Students to

Learn Material to Achieve Outcome

Assessment(s) to Determine Whether

Students have Achieved Outcome

1.0 Describe research topic and question

with clarity

Student will produce and elaborate upon a

formal social scientific research question

Timely completion of the stages of the

project, completion of the research report

and formal presentation

2.0 illustrate which method is being

employed to answer the research question

Students will be advised as to theoretical

and methodological decisions necessary to

optimize their project

Timely completion of the stages of the

project, completion of the research report

and formal presentation

3.0 depict and analyze data carefully and

comprehensively

Mentoring and consultation will take

place throughout the semester through the

process of analytical interpretation and
presenting professional scholarly work

Timely completion of the stages of the

project, completion of the research report

and formal presentation

Extra Credit: No extra credit assignments will be given for this course.

VIII. Grading Criteria:

All students will work throughout the semester in groups. The group members will read and

comment on their colleagues’ draft material.

90-100 % = A

Assignments 35% 80-89 % = B

Oral Report 15% 70-79 % = C

Final Paper 50% 60-69 % = D

_________ Below 60 = F

100%

IX. Policy Statements:

Recommended COVID-19 Syllabus Statement (continuously evolving based on new

guidance) “We know from existing data that wearing a mask in public can help prevent the

spread of COVID-19 in the community” (Lyu & Wehby, 2020; CDC, 2020; Johns Hopkins

Medicine, 2020). Following the DC Department of Health regulations and guidance from the

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The University of the District of Columbia

has determined that everyone will be required to wear a face mask in University buildings,

including classrooms. You MUST wear a mask appropriately (i.e., covering both your mouth and

nose) in the building if you are attending class in-person. Masks will be provided for students,

instructors, and staff, and everyone is expected to wear one while inside any University building.

This is to protect the health and safety of classmates, instructors, and the University community.

Anyone attending class in-person without a mask will be asked to put one on or leave. Instructors

will end class if anyone present refuses to wear a mask for the duration of class appropriately.

Students should also be sure they are situated at least six feet away from their fellow students

and seated in a seat that is designated to ensure that distance. Students who refuse to wear masks

appropriately or adhere to other stated requirements may face disciplinary action for the Student

5

Code of Conduct violations. On a case-by-case basis, students may consult with Accessibility

Resources Center for accommodations if they cannot wear a mask.

A. Americans with Disabilities Act Statement:

Any student with a documented disability (physical or cognitive) who requires academic

accommodation should contact the Disability Resources Center at (202) 274-6000 (voice) or

(202) 274-6152 (TTY for users who are deaf or hard of hearing) as soon as possible to request an

official letter outlining authorized accommodations.

B. Sexual Harassment and Racial Discrimination Policy Statement:

It is the policy of the University of the District of Columbia that sexual harassment and racial

harassment in any way of its students, staff and applicants for admission to the University are

prohibited.

X. Academic Integrity: Plagiarism and Cheating:

Students enrolling at the University of the District of Columbia assume the obligation to

maintain standards of academic integrity. Violations of academic obligations include: unethical

practices and acts of academic dishonesty, such as cheating, plagiarism, falsification, and the

facilitation of such acts. Cheating includes the actual giving or receiving of any unauthorized aid

or assistance or the actual giving or receiving of any unfair advantage on any form of academic

work. Plagiarism is the use of another’s ideas or words, or both, as if they were one’s own.

However, ideas or direct quotations from others are acceptable with appropriate citation of

source. Students are subject to dismissal from a degree program for unethical practices and acts

of academic dishonesty. It should also be stated that a plea of ignorance of the policy will not be

accepted. The following actions are prescribed whenever a violation of academic integrity is

noted:

• The Instructor will provide to the chairperson a written report with documentation of the
academic offense.

• The chairperson will present the facts to the departmental Academic Affairs Committee.

• The departmental Academic Affairs Committee will review the report, meet with all
parties concerned, and make a formal recommendation to the department chair for

transmittal to the academic dean.

If it is determined that a student has violated the Academic Integrity Policy, the academic dean

may suspend the student from the University.

XI. Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Statement:

The University of the District of Columbia is an Equal Opportunity Affirmative Action

institution. The University prohibits discrimination or harassment against any person on the

basis of the actual or perceived actual race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability,

sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, family responsibilities, matriculation, political

affiliation, marital status, personal appearance, genetic information, familial status, source of

income, status as a victim of an intra-family offense, place of residence or business, or status as

a covered veteran, as provided for and to the extent required by District and Federal statutes and

regulations. This policy covers all programs, services policies, and procedures of the University,

6

including admission to educational programs and employment. The University emphasizes the

recruitment of minorities, women, disabled individuals, disabled veterans, Vietnam era veterans,

and other eligible veterans. For further information regarding this policy statement or to file a

complaint of discrimination or harassment please contact:

Yasmin J. Mitchell, SPHR, Equal Opportunity Officer

University of the District of Columbia, 4200 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Building 38, Room 301,

Washington, DC 20008, 202.274.5442, [email protected]

XII. Course Evaluations:

Evaluations should include questions about the use of learning outcomes and the assessment

process.

Course evaluations will be scheduled and administered by the College.

This syllabus is subject to change

7

Appendix

1. Research Paper Guidelines

Title Page
All research proposals have a title page. Put “Your Title” in the top center. The class identification

(POLS: 498: Senior Seminar), your name, and the date should also appear on this title page. The title

should include critical key words such as your dependent and independent variables. Avoid unnecessary

words like “A Study of …” It is often a good idea to have a subtitle that explains or supplements the main

title.

Abstract Page
Provide an abstract of the analysis, which is a brief summary of the content of the full study. It may

include the purpose, hypothesis, methodology, and significance of the study or project. Some phrases or

words are “abstracted” from the main body of the text and so, some repetition is acceptable. The length

should be about 300 words or less. The abstract is usually included on a separate page, although it is

often acceptable to have it on top of the first page of the proposal or final report. The abstract should be

single-spaced and hanging (hanging-indentation). All other sections of the proposal should be double

spaced. It is a good idea to write your final abstract after all other sections of the paper and analysis are

completed.

Table of Contents
Self explanatory

Chapter I: Introduction
Two most important things in the introduction section are the purpose and significance of the study. You

start off your introduction section with a brief narrative introduction to the issue or topic of

research. You then continue with the following sections.

A. Statement of the problem (need). What is the (social, administrative, or political) problem that

will be studied? If no specific problem will be addressed, some basic information about the topic can

be provided in this section. This section describes the issue and the context of the study you propose.

B. Purpose of the study. This section begins with “The purpose of this study is ….” The purpose should

be clearly articulated in a grammatically correct sentence or two. This sentence should say exactly

what the ultimate goal of your research is, and nothing more.

C. Research questions. Research questions are expressed in the question format and hypotheses are

expressed in the statement format. Questions are broader than hypotheses; otherwise, research

questions and hypotheses are very similar. Questions and hypotheses are directly correlated to each

other: For each question there will be corresponding hypotheses. Limit your questions and hypotheses

to no more than four each. If you are conducting a qualitative study, you may only have one very

general question.

D. Hypotheses. Express the hypothesis in the research hypothesis format (not in the null hypothesis

8

format). Directional or causal hypotheses are preferred. Each hypothesis should indicate the dependent

and independent variables. Also, identify one or two control variables that may affect the relationship

between the independent and dependent variables. Limit the number of hypotheses to four. For

qualitative work, you may find you do not have detailed hypotheses.

E. Importance (significance) of the study. Why should we care about the topic? Why is the study

important? Does the study add new pieces of information to the existing literature?

F. Uniqueness of the study. How is the study different from other studies? What’s new? There are many

studies on the topic, but how does your study address different aspects of the topic? Does it study

different populations? For example, most studies were done with old people, but your study will be

done with young people. Most studies were done at the national level, but your study will be done in a

smaller geographical area or with only one organization. Your study may propose to use different

research methods. For example, most studies were done with secondary data, but yours will be done

with in-depth interviews. What makes your study special?

G. Definitions of terms. Defines unusual terms and phrases that are not commonly used or widely

known to a general audience. (This section may go to an appendix).

H. Delimitations of the Study. This section defines or narrows the scope of the study by explaining what

will be studied and what will NOT be studied. In most cases, we cannot study all aspects of a topic

because we do not have enough time, energy, or technical skills. So, we delimit the scope of the study

by focusing on only one or more aspects of a topic. For example, assume that we plan to study the

issue of quality of life. We may state that we will study the issue of quality of life only in terms of

social relationships (excluding the financial, health, and other aspects of quality of life). Then, we are

delimiting the scope of the study. We may also delimit the scope of the study by defining or narrowing

the study population. For example, we may state that the study will deal with the issue of quality of life

only among the senior citizens in one city. This way, we are delimiting the scope of the study to the

population of senior citizens in that particular city.

I. Limitations of the study. This section discusses various weaknesses of the study. For example, if the

sample is not representative of the population (because it is a nonrandom sample), its findings may not

be generalized to the study population (the study has a weakness or a limitation). If the study deals with

perceptions, but not facts, its findings may have limited applications. If the study deals with only young

people’s behavior, its findings may not be generalized to the general public.

Chapter II: Review of the Literature
This section presents an organized review of the relevant literature. What have other scholars or

researchers written about the variables, research questions, and hypotheses? In other words, what is

known and what is not known? The review should be organized, relevant (particularly to the research

questions and hypotheses), and critical, to some extent. The literature you review should also be current,

meaning, it should have been published within the last five years, unless you use a classic publication.

The last part of this section should clearly explain why/how your study is different from the existing

studies. It is best to organize the literature review around the research questions/hypotheses (or around

9

the dependent and independent variables). Usually it is NOT a good idea to organize it in chronological

order or from the most import to the least important or as strung together annotations. When writing your

literature review, you are required to review five scholarly articles from leading journals, preferably peer-

reviewed. You must cite all material and information that did not originate in your own head or thinking.

Furthermore, you cannot use anonymous referrals, such as “senior administration officials cite that the

current deficit does not matter.” If you make such a statement you must identify and cite who these

individuals are who made such statements. When referring to secondary sources found within a primary

source, it is best to get the secondary source such that you can cite it as a primary source.

Chapter III: Theoretical Framework
This section explains the theories of the research. Theories explain why the independent variable leads to

the dependent variable in each of the hypotheses. Theories are also the framework that supports the

ideology behind your questions or hypotheses. You may use other peoples’ theories from your literature

review or develop your own. You should name your theory and explain the background, structure, and

components of the theory or theories. Diagrams or figures may be useful in explaining them. For

example, a study on learning would include a theoretical discussion on cognitive development. Keep in

mind that hypotheses that are supported by a growing body of data evolve into theories.

Chapter IV: Methodology

The methodology section specifically lays out exactly how you will go about your study. What are your

plan, your blueprint, your instrument, proposed measurement, and your sample? It will include most of

the following sections depending upon whether or not your study is qualitative or quantitative.

A. Research design. A design is the complete strategy for your research agenda. This should include the

components of the entire research process. It should talk about the data you collected and analyzed and

how you completed this. You should specify whether or not your research was qualitative or quantitative.

B. Measurement of variables. How were the concepts (variables) in the hypotheses measured? More

specifically, what were the indicators of the variables? If the variables were measured with survey

questions, your instrument and the specific survey questions should be attached in your appendix.

However, which instruments measure what variables should be explained here.

C. Sampling. Define the study population and sample. What was the specific sample that was used?

How were the sample elements selected? Did you use a random sample, simple random, stratified

sampling, snowball and so on.

D. Research Methods. What was the method by which the information was collected? Was it a

survey, field study, a meta analysis of existing data (secondary data), focus group, content analysis, in-

depth interview, etc?

E. Plan of Analysis. Please explain the following:

1. Data acquisition and management procedures (coding, inputting, cleaning, etc.)
2. Analysis Methods. What statistical methods. Why they are appropriate?
3. Analysis expectations. What is expected from the analysis?

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Chapter V: Findings
In this section, which will be one of the final sections to be written, you will need to organize your

analysis and results or findings in a way that the reader can follow. You may choose to organize your

findings around your research questions and hypotheses. If you used statistics, you need not show

formulas for standard procedures, but do so for complicated statistics. Present your descriptive statistics

first and organize large numbers of statistics in tables and give each table a number. When you describe

your statistics in the tables, point out only the highlights for the reader, do not go over each number.

Spell-out numbers that are less then ten (example: Seven respondents ….. and spell out numbers that

start a sentence. Qualitative results should be verbalized in an organized and clear manner.

Chapter VI : Discussion
It is sometimes best to start this section with a summary: at least point out the questions you answered

that were raised by your research questions. Make sure you refer to your research questions,

hypotheses, and purpose, all of which you stated in your introduction. Talk about how the results are

consistent with the results in the literature or how your findings differ. Consider interpreting your

results and offering explanations for your findings. What do your findings mean? Talk about the

strengths and limitations of your study and if possible, tell the reader the implications of the results.

You should close this section by making specific recommendations for future research.

Endnotes
(If there are any and if footnotes are not used in the text)

Appendixes
Survey questions, model diagrams, preliminary data, statistical formulas, and/or other relevant

information may be included. Anything that is important to your study, but does not belong in the body

of the text.

References
At least five scholarly articles need to be referenced in addition to any other sources cited in your work.

Other references such as books, policy manuals, company annual reports, budgets, newspaper and

magazine articles may be included as well. Keep in mind, you need to cite any material that provided new

information to you during this research process, this means, anything new or that you learned while

preparing to write your introduction, literature review, theoretical section, and discussion needs to be

cited. When writing, you must cite the sources of each idea or item of information you use, whether you

quote, paraphrase, summarize, or merely refer to it. Follow the format for the APSA Author-date style.

2. Guidelines for Final Paper Delivery

Presentations should last no more than 10 minutes in panels. The discussant (Dr. Shroyer)

will summarize and discuss what you reveal from your study and call for questions and answers

from the audience after all papers have been presented.

11

Advice to Presenters

The following format is preferred and followed in American Academic Conference

Organization. Begin with a one-minute overview summary of the paper that includes the

central question(s) addressed and the major conclusions.

Explanation. Follow with the reasons listeners ought to accept the paper’s conclusions:

the underlying theory, description of the evidence, methodological defense of the evidence,

and connection to (and improvement upon) the existing literature. This manner of exposition

differs from that of a journal article, but it is more appropriate to a conference format.

Slides. A Slide presentation or presentation of web-based documents are recommended, but

are not obligatory. Try to economize on the use of these. (Avoid ritualistic presentations of

tables intended to prove merely that data exist and have been analyzed.) Slides should be

readable from at least 30 feet and should be no more in number than five. They should be

displayed long enough for viewers actually to comprehend the message they are supposed to

convey. Twenty-two-point font or above should be used when constructing slides.

Technology. Many people use PowerPoint or similar computer-based software, but be

prepared for disaster. Be able to present your paper without the aid of PowerPoint should the

software not work.

Use of the rostrum. Presenters should preferably speak from the rostrum rather than from the

table where they sit, so that they are easier to see and hear. During the question period;

however, sitting at the table is preferable, to avoid delays going to and from the rostrum.

12

POLITICAL SCIENCE Research Paper Grading Rubric

CATEGORY/Points A B C D F

Title Page

required

Page includes:
title, student’s
name,
professor’s
name, course
name, and date.
Is neat, no errors.

Introduction

15 points

Information
clearly relates to
the main topic or
issue. Includes
problem,
purpose,
question(s),
hypotheses,
significance,
uniqueness,
delimitations,
and limitations

Information
clearly relates to
the main
topic/issue.
Evidence of six
to seven
sections, well
written.

Information
clearly relates to
the main
topic/issue.
Evidence of four
to five sections
fairly well written.

Information has
little or nothing to
do with the main
topic/issue, or is
missing.
Evidence of
three or fewer
sections poorly
written.

Missing
Introductory
narrative,
evidence of
some sections.

Literature Review

15 points

Selected
literature meets
the specified
guidelines related
to currency,
primary scholarly
sources (5), no
anonymous
referrals, and
“academic
voice”.

Paper meets
most of the
guidelines but
misses on one.

Paper meets
most of the
guidelines but
misses on two.

Paper meets
most of the
guidelines but
misses on two or
more.

Fails to meet
guidelines.

Theoretical Frame

15 points

Narrative fully
incorporates at
least one theory
accurately to the
issue and topic.

Narrative
incorporates at
least one theory,
but is not fully
developed or
accurately
described.

Narrative
incorporates one
theory but
misses on
development,
integration, and
accuracy.

Narrative
incorporates
unrelated theory,
and or fails to
incorporate and
integrate.

Missing

Methods

10 points

Narrative
accurately and
clearly describes
design,
measurement,
sample, method,
and plan of
analysis.

Misses on one
standard..

Misses on two
standards.

Misses on three
standards.

Misses on more
than three
standards.

Presentation of
findings,
Conclusion/
Discussion

15 points

Findings are
clearly described,
questions
answered, and
tables clear and
accurate.
Discussion is
critical and
engaging, and
poses new
direction.

Misses on one Misses on two Misses on three Misses on four
or more.

13

Citation – APSA
Author-date in
text style

10 points

All sources
(information and
graphics) are
accurately
documented in
the desired
(APSA –in text
author-date)
format.

All sources
(information and
graphics) are
accurately
documented, but
a few are not in
the desired
APSA format.

All sources
(information and
graphics) are
accurately
documented, but
many are not in
the desired
APSA format,
some errors.

Some sources
are not
accurately
documented.
Citations are
missing and/or
are in error,
using wrong
style.

APSA format not
used, citations
missing or
critically flawed.

Paragraph
Construction
And general
writing

10 points

All paragraphs
include
introductory
sentence,
explanations or
details, and
concluding
sentence.

Most paragraphs
include
introductory
sentence,
explanations or
details, and
concluding
sentence.

Paragraphs
include related
information but
were typically not
constructed well.

Paragraphing
structure was not
clear and
sentences were
not typically
related within the
paragraphs.

Sentences and
paragraphs fail
to meet
elementary
English
standards.

Mechanics

10 points

No grammatical,
spelling or
punctuation
errors.

Almost no
grammatical,
spelling or
punctuation
errors

A few
grammatical
spelling, or
punctuation
errors.

Many
grammatical,
spelling, or
punctuation
errors.

Document was
not spell
/grammar
checked.

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