week 5 final

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Application of Research Techniques

Activity Due Date Format

Grading Percent

Reflecting on General Education and Career

Day 3
(1st Post)
Discussion Forum 4

End of Course Survey

Day 7

End of Course Survey

0.5

Global Societal Problem, Argument and Solution

Day 7

Final Paper

24

Learning Outcomes

This week students will:

  1. Apply research techniques that examine the influence of academic knowledge on a global societal issue.
  2. Identify skills acquired from general education courses in relation to academic, personal, and professional growth.
  3. Apply critical thinking skills when evaluating and determining the validity, strengths, and weaknesses of sources used when writing a formal argumentative essay.

Introduction

In Week 4, you were challenged in using your critical thinking skills when completing the Critical Thinking Quiz and were asked to find an article that demonstrates good critical thinking and an article that demonstrates lack of critical thinking. You were also asked to share your progress in researching the global societal issue you chose.

During Week 5, you will continue to focus on the principles of general education and think about the skills you have acquired that can be used in your desired career. It is a good idea to research the jobs that are currently posted on career websites to gain a better understanding of what will be expected of you based on the job descriptions you locate in your career field. This week you will continue to apply your knowledge of research techniques while finishing the Final Paper. Using your critical thinking skills and knowing how to write effectively will ensure a better chance of achieving a great career. This should be demonstrated in your Final Paper, in which you are to provide evidence that supports both sides of the global societal issue. This is where your critical thinking skills come into play.

The final task you need to do is answer the one-question survey in the course acknowledging whether or not you completed the survey. It is important that you answer this one question, so that you can earn half a point.

Welcome to Week 5

If this video is not loading properly, you can access the video by clicking here (Links to an external site.).

Video Transcript Download Video Transcript
Required Resources
Articles
Coyle, J. P. (2010). Teaching writing skills that enhance student success in future employment (Links to an external site.). Collected Essays on Teaching and Learning, 3, 195-200. doi:10.22329/celt.v3i0.3262
The full-text version of this article can be accessed through the ERIC database in the University of Arizona Global Campus Library. The author of this article stresses the importance for college students to develop better writing skills in college, because employers seek effective writers. The ability to write effectively can have a positive impact on work performance. This article will assist you with your Reflecting on General Education and Career discussion this week.
Neureiter, M., & Traut-Mattausch, E. (2016). An inner barrier to career development: preconditions of the impostor phenomenon and consequences for career development (Links to an external site.). Frontiers in Psychology, 1-15. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00048
The full-text version of this article can be accessed through the EBSCOhost database in the University of Arizona Global Campus Library. The authors of this article completed a study in which “imposter feelings” that lead to fears of failure and success decreased one’s ability to effectively plan a career and, thus, impacts one’s level of motivation. This article will assist you with your Reflecting on General Education and Career discussion this week.
The Muse. (2013, November 1). 9 questions that’ll help you find your dream career (Links to an external site.). Forbes. http://www.forbes.com/sites/dailymuse/2013/11/01/9…
This article provides nine questions that help the reader think more about how to achieve the career they have always wanted. The questions focus on current skills and qualities that allows the reader decide if a career change is necessary. This article will assist you with your Reflecting on General Education and Career discussion this week.
Accessibility Statement does not exist.
Privacy Policy (Links to an external site.)
Multimedia
Radcliff, R. (Writer). (2007). Business, management & administration (Links to an external site.) [Series episode]. In P. Iacono and A. S. Weber (Executive Producers), The complete career clusters [Streaming video]. Films On Demand database.
The full version of this video is available through the Films on Demand database in the University of Arizona Global Campus Library. This video has several segments that provide information on how to get into a green career through fields related to business, management, and administration jobs. It further describes how companies can be greener to make the world more sustainable, such as recycling boxes and any plastics. This video will assist you with your Reflecting on General Education and Career discussion this week.
Web Page
University of Arizona Global Campus. (n.d.). General Academic Information and Policies (Links to an external site.). https://www.uagc.edu/general-academic-information-…
This web page provides information about University of Arizona Global Campus Academic Policies and will assist you in your Reflecting on General Education and Career discussion this week.
Accessibility Statement does not exist.
Privacy Policy (Links to an external site.)
Recommended Resources
Multimedia
Nikpour, K. (Director), & Silverstein, B. (Producer). (2004). What employers want: Skills and attitudes (Links to an external site.) [Series episode]. In D. L. Nelson (Executive producer), Career advantage: Strategies for success; Career and educational exploration: What’s out there for me? [Streaming video]. Films On Demand database.
The full version of this video is available through the Films on Demand database in the University of Arizona Global Campus Library. This video includes 8 segments which covers skills and characteristics employers look for. This video may assist you with your Reflecting on General Education and Career discussion this week.
Vohra, S. (Producer). (2007). Spotlight on careers in education (Links to an external site.) [Series episode]. In T. Smith & H. Stein (Executive Producers), The road to success: Stories of career satisfaction in popular fields [Streaming video]. Films On Demand database.
The full version of this video is available through the Films On Demand database in the University of Arizona Global Campus Library. This video includes eight segments that highlight individuals in history who overcame obstacles in their lives and developed a passion for teaching, such as Gaston Caperton and Virginia Jose. The segments provide the viewer a sense of motivation and determination to persevere through difficult times in order to receive education. This video may assist you with your Reflecting on General Education and Career discussion forum this week. This video has closed captioning and a transcript.

GEN499 Week 5 Guidance

Week Five Blue Bow

Introduction

Week Four was dedicated to critical thinking skills. We looked at the definition of critical thinking, understanding what the skills and process are, and how and why critical thinking skills are important for everyone in their personal, professional, and political lives. We noted that critical thinking skills are going to become an increasingly important part of our lives due to the rapid changes caused by the development of modern technologies.

During Week Five, we will tie together everything that we have covered thus far in class and put as much of our knowledge and skills into the Capstone Discussion and the Final Research Project. This week we will continue to focus on the principles of general education and continue applying what we have learned through the course on research techniques used when finishing the Final Research Project.


Putting it all together: Learning, Thinking, Speaking

Knowing how to collect information from the Internet and communicate in a networked world is critical. In order to find our ways in the world, to make important decisions, to improve job performance and career opportunities, and to participate in our society as citizens to the best of our ability, we need to know where to turn for the latest, most current, and best information.

The popular, mass media are not a good source of information. It may be one of the worst sources for information. Basing decisions on the opinions of those who are ill-informed, uneducated, or biased (socially, culturally, or politically) is not a good idea. As educated, reasonable adults, we need to use the best sources of information and apply the principles of logic and critical thinking to the information from the best sources of information.

Having researched and done some careful thinking, we must also consider alternatives, and before reaching a decision, we need to check ourselves for possible bias or for having reached a foregone conclusion based on our personal perceptions of life, the universe and everything.

Worldview (Links to an external site.)

Personal perception involves how we look at others and the world around us. It is natural to perceive situations from our own, possibly limited, viewpoints. However, in order to function and be successful in a global society and/or economy, overcoming perceptual barriers is difficult but essential if you are to craft messages and communicate with others of different cultures.

The sum total of your perceptions, thoughts, feelings, and attitudes make up your worldview. When worldviews are too different, then communication becomes difficult (if not impossible). Although it may seem intuitively obvious to even the most casual observer, different people from different cultures have different worldviews. The average person in Xinjiang has a very different worldview from yours. The embattled Yazidi (in northern Iraq) have a very different worldview from the people in their region. (That is the major reason why they are being persecuted and executed in mass numbers.)

If people come from different backgrounds or cultures or have different life experiences, then their perceptions are likely to be quite different from the perceptions of the people they are communicating with. Differences can lead to serious consequences. Being unable to appreciate differences can lead to serious consequences. Being unable (or unwilling) to try to communicate across, over, under, around, or through those differences can lead to serious consequences.

Week Five Epic FailFailing to understand and appreciate differences can lead to very serious consequences. Thinking that everyone must be just the same as we are shows a lack of respect for the possibility that we just might be wrong (and may be wrong in some serious ways, too). Being able to value difference and to learn from those who are different increases the value, depth, and joy of life.

To communicate effectively and efficiently, we have to be clear and specific about what we say and write, how we communicate, and what we communicate. Sometimes what we think we are saying may not be what others think we are saying. Just as each of us has our own, particular worldviews and our own, particular understanding of things, others have their worldviews and understanding and so listen through their filters. Thus, they may hear what you are saying but hear it in a different way than you intend. For that reason (and many more), we have to be sure that we use language correctly, use words and terms correctly and appropriately, speak at a common level, and check to make sure that others understand what we have said. Getting feedback is an important step in the communication process.

POINTS TO PONDER

  • How would you define your worldview?
  • How has college changed your worldview?
  • Why it is important to question your worldview?

Week Five Activities and Assignments

Here is a checklist of the weekly activities. Keep this handy as you move through the weekly tasks.

Week 5 Learning Activities

Due Date

Review and reflect on Instructor Guidance

Tuesday – Day 1

Read Required and Recommended Materials (articles, videos, tutorials, etc.)

Suggested no later than Day 3

Post initial response to Discussion 1 – Reflecting on General Education and Career

Thursday – Day 3

Complete End of Course Survey one-question quiz within the course

Monday – Day 7

Complete Final Argumentative Essay

Monday – Day 7

Post two responses to peers in the Discussion 1

Monday – Day 7


References

Brown parcel isolated white [Image]. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.istockphoto.com/photo/brown-parcel-isol…

Challenging limits: Greatest human achievements [Video file]. (2012). In Films on Demand. Retrieved from http://fod.infobase.com/PortalPlaylists.aspx?wID=1…

Epic fail red round grunge stamp on white [Image]. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.istockphoto.com/vector/epic-fail-red-ro…

7 steps to improving communication [Video file]. (2001). In Films on Demand. Retrieved from http://fod.infobase.com/PortalPlaylists.aspx?wID=1…


here is the assignment needs to be in APA format


What is an APA In-Text Citation?

An in-text citation is a citation within your writing that shows where you found your information, facts, quotes, and research. All APA in-text citations require the same basic information:

  • Author’s last name (no first names or initials)
  • Year of publication (or “n.d.” if there is “no date”:(LastName, n.d., p.#))
  • Page number, paragraph number, chapter, section, or time stamp where the information can be located within the source (only required for direct quotes)

To see how to format MLA in-text citations or Chicago Style citations, see these guides:

How do I format an APA In-Text Citation?

There are two main ways to format an in-text citation: Parenthetical citation or Narrative citation.

  1. Parenthetical citation: Put all the citation information at the end of the sentence:
    Example: "The systematic development of literacy and schooling meant a new division in society, between the educated and the uneducated” (Cook-Gumperz, 1986, p. 27). Note 1: Place direct quotes within quotation marks. Note 2: Use parentheses to enclose the in-text citation. Note 3: Use commas to separate the last name, year, and page number within the in-text citation. Note 4: Place the period after the citation.
  2. Narrative citation: Include some of the citation information as part of the sentence:Example: According to Cook-Gumperz (1986), “The systematic development of literacy and schooling meant a new division in society, between the educated and the uneducated” (p. 27). Note 1: Use a signal phrase that includes the author's last name. Note 2: After the last name, state the publication year within parentheses. Note 3: After the quote, state the page number with paretheses. Note 4: Place the period after the citation.

Each source cited in-text must also be listed in your References list.

However, an exception to this rule includes any personal communications:

  • Personal communications are works that cannot be retrieved by most readers, and include interviews, emails, live speeches or lectures, letters, or non-archived classroom discussions.
  • Personal communications should be cited with in-text citations only.
    • Example of in-text citation: (M.A. Jones, personal communication, October 29, 2018)
Citing Quotes

Citing Paraphrases or Summaries

Citing eBooks with No Page Numbers

Citing Web Pages

Citing Video or Audio Sources

Citing No Author

Citing Sources with Multiple Authors

Citing Secondary or Indirect Sources

Citing Multiple Sources in a Single Sentence

Citing Legal Sources

Related Video Tutorial

Related Interactive Practice Activity

Introductions and conclusions are important components of any essay. They work to book-end the argument made in the body paragraphs by first explaining what points will be made (in the introduction) and then summarizing what points were made (in the conclusion).

Introductions

An introduction is typically the first paragraph of your paper. The goal of your introduction is to let your reader know what he or she can expect from your paper. While there is no one formula for writing a good introduction, in general, an introduction should do the following:

  1. Attract the Reader’s Attention

    Begin your introduction with a “hook” that grabs your reader’s attention and introduces the general topic. Here are some suggestions on how to create a “hook”:

    • State an interesting fact or statistic about your topic
    • Ask a rhetorical question
    • Reveal a common misconception about your topic
    • Set the scene of your story: who, when, where, what, why, how?
    • Share an anecdote (a humorous short story) that captures your topic
  2. State Your Focused Topic

    After your “hook”, write a sentence or two about the specific focus of your paper. What is your paper about? Why is this topic important? This part of the introduction can include background information on your topic that helps to establish its context.

  3. State your Thesis

    Finally, include your thesis statement. The kind of thesis you include depends on the type of paper you are writing, but, in general, your thesis should include:

    • your specific topic
    • your main point about that topic
    • the points of discussion you will include in your paper

    Your thesis should be clear, and easy to find. Most often, it is the last sentence of the introduction.

Sample Introduction

Sample Introduction

Conclusions

A conclusion works to remind your reader of the main points of your paper and summarizes what you want your reader to “take away” from your discussion. Consider these tips when writing your conclusion:

  • Begin with your rephrased thesis statement to remind your reader of the point of your paper.
  • Summarize the points you made in your paper and show how they support your argument; tie all the pieces of your paper together.
  • Tell your reader what the significance of your argument might be. Why is the discussion important? Do you want your reader to think differently, question something, or perform some action? Make a recommendation of what your reader should “do” with the information you just gave them, or share the importance of the topic.

Sample ConclusionAPA formatting is a set of rules and guidelines for styling your paper and citing your sources. The APA resources on this site follow the APA 7 edition.APA formatting is a set of rules and guidelines for styling your paper and citing your sources. The APA resources on this site follow the APA 7 edition.

Sample Conclusion

APA formatting is a set of rules and guidelines for styling your paper and citing your sources. The APA resources on this site follow the APA 7 edition.

Formatting

  • The font should be consistent throughout the document and can be one of the following:
    • 12 pt. Times New Roman
    • 11 pt. Georgia
    • 10 pt. Computer Modern
    • 11 pt. Calibri
    • 11 pt. ArielTitle Page & Headers
      • A University of Arizona Global Campus title page contains:
        • page number (in the top right margin/header)
        • title of your paper (in bold and first letter of any major words capitalized)
        • your full name
        • school name
        • course code and name
        • instructor’s name
        • the due date
    • 10 pt. Lucida Sans Unicode
  • Entire document is double spaced.
  • Margins are 1 inch on all sides.
  • Align the body text in your paper left, leaving the right side uneven or ragged. Do not use justified alignment.
  • Paragraphs in the body of the paper are indented 1/2 inch or one “tab” stop.
  • Insert only 1 space after punctuation, including punctuation at the end of a sentence.
  • Student papers do not include a running head, author note, or abstract, unless specifically requested.

Section headings are not required for an APA paper, but level 1 headings can be very helpful to help your reader move from one major topic to another, especially for lengthy papers. Level 1 headings can be placed anywhere in your paper as a way to classify or organize your paper into sections. For a section of your paper that needs to be broken down into additional sections, this is when a level 2 heading is used, and so on.

In-Text Citations

  • All in-text citations for direct quotations include…
    • the authors’ last names (or title if no author)
    • the year the source was published
    • the page, paragraph, chapter, section, or time stamp of the quotation.
  • All in-text citations for paraphrased information includes…
    • the author last names (or title if no author)
    • the publication year.
    • Note: Including the page, paragraph, chapter, section, or time stamp is optional for paraphrased information.
  • All sources cited within the paper are also in the References list (with the exception of personal communications, which are only cited in the text).
  • All quotations less than 40 words are enclosed in quotation marks. The in-text citation comes before the ending punctuation.
  • All quotations more than 40 words are formatted as a block quote. They start on a new line with the entire quote indented a half an inch from the left margin—no quotation marks are needed. The in-text citation comes after the punctuation.
  • The References list starts on a new page after the text of the paper.
  • The title, References, is centered at the top of the page, in bold font.
  • Reference entries are listed in alphabetical order.
  • All sources listed in the References have at least one corresponding in-text citation within the body of the text.
  • References are double spaced (between entries and within each entry)and each entry uses a hanging indent.
  • Style
    • Numbers one through nine are spelled out. Any numbers above 10 are written using actual numbers.
    • Avoid the use of contractions (e.g., don’t, can’t, shouldn’t), clichés, and slang. Keep an academic tone to your writing.
    • Limit the use of passive voice.
    • Avoid anthropomorphism.
    • Use appropriate pronouns.
    • Use italics only when appropriate in formatting or to emphasize a word.
    • Avoid biased or non-inclusive language.
    • Use appropriate APA level headings.
    • The serial comma is used to separated items in a series of three or more items.
    • Lists follow seriation rules.
    • Format and properly cite all tables, images, and figures.
    • Use past tense when referring to research or sources that have already been published.
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